Sunday, November 1, 2009

Linzer Torte

Some 2 years ago friend gave me interesting book Ein kulinarisches Rendezvous mit Baden -recipes and stories from the part of Germany where he lives. My German is very limited - consists of basic phrases and food vocabulary. This alows me to understand the list of ingrediences and some parts of method.
It is a bit odd to find Linzer Torte (Linz is Austrian city) in local German book, but this particular recipe works really well comparing to those I used before.


300g plain flour
250g sugar
150g grated hazelnuts (or almonds)
zest from 1 lemon
1 tsp grated cinnamon
200g cold butter
1 egg
good quality raspberry jam (of redcurrant jelly)
1 egg yolk for glazing

Put flour, hazelnuts, lemon zest, sugar and cinnamon into a bowl and stir. Add cold butter cut into cubes. Mix with your hand quickly until it resembles coarse crumbles, then add an egg and mix. Form the ball and leave it rest in the fridge for 1 hour.
Divide the ball into 2 parts. Roll the bigger part and place it in cake form - either round or oblong. Spread generous layer of jam over the pastry. Roll the smaller part, cut long stripes of pastry and arrange them on jam layer. Brush the pastry with egg yolk. Bake in preheated oven at 175 degrees for about one hour.
Here it is - and my recommendation: cut out a bit thinner stripes :-)

It tastes even better after 2 or 3 days and keeps very well in airtight container.


5 comments:

  1. With you, English Mum and Miska with her parents ... I'll be fatty than a house !!!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Yes, yes, that's all we want - to keep everyone fed :-)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Slovaks are pretty good at that !!!!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Zuzana,

    my auntie does something similar, thanks for bringig out some nice memories :) Have to try it. The jam is a very important part of it - have you find here redcurrant jam?
    I like reading your blogs, always leave me feeling happy :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thank, I'm glad you like it.
    I bought redcurrant jelly some time ago, you have to try small shops or deli. They stock jams from small producers. And, of course, farmers' markets.

    ReplyDelete